Category Archives: Reading Proficiency

It’s here! It’s clear! U Can Connect works!

kids on computers

 Reading Study at The Boys and Girls Club in Murray, Utah

 U CAN LEARN in conjunction with The Murray City Boys and Girls Club of South Valley conducted a reading study during after-school hours to access the effectiveness of the online reading program, U CAN CONNECT, (www.ucanconnect.org) and the feasibility of putting it in their club as a permanent training program. Sixteen children were tested using standardized measures, focusing on auditory and visual processing skills, rapid word naming, visual tracking and reading and spelling skills.

The children were divided into 2 groups: “trainees” and “control.” Ten trainees finished 28 days of the program, a half hour a day, in the computer lab with one to two teacher aides present to monitor the children. No other instruction was provided outside of playing the 12 U CAN CONNECT games.

Fourteen of the children were tested again. (2 children moved from the area) The control group now has begun their training.

The results for the before and after testing are described below.

Testing and Results:

TAPS-3 The Test of Auditory Processing Skills-3 was administered in part to assess a student’s auditory processing ability in 3 areas. Auditory processing is the brain’s ability to decipher and catalogue information sent to it by the ear and is very important in reading and spelling since children need to ‘hear’ what sounds constitute a word and then remember what order they heard them in. It is also important in listening to auditory instructions, and in tracking details of a conversation.

U CAN CONNECT has 3 auditory training games but none that specifically training recalling sentences.

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Although the control group also made some improvement on recalling numbers and words, they made no improvement on repeating sentences. When we view the overall standard scores (85-115 is the average range) we see that the trainee group moved into the average range overall while the control group stayed in the poor to low average range.

The Test of Visual-Perceptual Skills-R was given in part to assess Visual Perceptual skills.  Visual Perception, according to the literature, does not measure eyesight but measures instead what the subject does with what he sees.  In a broad sense, it is the brain’s ability to understand and make sense of what the eyes ‘send it’.

Visual processing is a very important factor in reading and spelling since words need to be quickly recognized as being same or different, words need to be visually recalled so that they do not need to be sounded out each time and words need to be quickly processed in order to be read fluently.

6 games on U CAN CONNECT focus on increasing visual processing skills.

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Pre and post testing, change in points from the first standard score to the second score

Visual Discrimination:   Trainees increased 30 points, control increased 1 point

Visual Memory:   Trainees increased 12 points, control increased 0

Visual Spatial Relations:   Trainees increased 24 points, control increased 3 points

This test showed a very significant gap between the children who trained and those that did not. The trainees moved form their pretesting scores of the poor and below average ranges to the average to above average ranges, while the control group, either made little improvement or went backward on the post testing.

The Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement II was administered to ascertain academic success in three areas, 2 in reading and 1 in spelling. Decoding real words, decoding nonsense words and spelling are all important variables in being a proficient reader. Form A was administered in pretesting and Form B was used on reassessment so the children were not reading or spelling the same words during the test.

One game in U CAN CONNECT focuses on spelling and one game focuses on decoding real words. None of the games addresses reading nonsense words.

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Pre and post testing, change in points from the first standard score to the second score

Decoding real words:   Trainees increased 19 SS  points, control decreased 11 SS point

Spelling:   Trainees increased 23 SS points, control decreased 15 SS points

Decoding nonsense words:   Trainees increased 56 SS points, control decreased 20 SS points

 Once again, this testing showed a very big difference in the children who trained for 28 days and those that got no specific training. It should be noted that nonsense word decoding, although not trained in any of the 12 games on U CAN CONNECT, made the biggest jump in post testing. We believe it is due to better attention to task, better visual processing skills and better auditory phonemic awareness.

The Test of Verbal Conceptualization and Fluency was given in part to assess quick visual sequencing abilities. On the Trails C, a child needs to quickly connect numbers 1-21, to demonstrate visual processing and visual sequencing speed.  Slow visual tracking means that a student would have a difficult time in looking at visual material and trying to do things quickly, affecting all school work but in particular reading and test taking.

On this testing, the lower the score the better, meaning the student connected the 21 numbers in a faster time.

Two games in U CAN CONNECT work on this skill.

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Pre and post testing, change in seconds from the first score to the second score

 

Trails C:   Trainees decreased 44 seconds, control increased 4 seconds

Trainees moved in to the average to high average range while control students remained in the below average range.

The RAN/RAS Tests (Rapid Automatic Naming/Rapid Alternating Stimulus Tests) was administered to assess the student’s ability to name letters, numbers, objects and colors as fast as possible. Problems in Rapid Automatic Naming have a direct correlation to reading fluency and children with slow rapid naming skills are often slow readers affecting reading comprehension, fluency and interest in focusing on a story.

No games in U CAN CONNECT work on this task but many of the games require quick visual identification of words or chunks of words.

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Pre and post testing, change in standard scores from the first score to the second score

 

Averaged SS on all subtests:  Trainees decreased 50 points, control increased 6 points

The trainees moved into the average range for rapid automatic naming while the control group stayed in the below average range overall.

The GORT-5 (Gray Oral Reading Test-fifth edition) was used to assess reading fluency, accuracy and comprehension. The student was asked to read increasing harder paragraphs while they were timed on speed, marked on word accuracy and then asked 5 questions for comprehension. Form A was used in pretesting and Form B was used in post testing so the students were not familiar with the paragraphs.

No games in U CAN CONNECT have the student practicing this skill.

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Pre and post testing, change in overall standard scores from the first to the second score

 

Averaged SS on all subtests:  Trainees increased 34 SS points, control increased 4 SS points

When the areas of rate, accuracy and comprehension were assigned standard scores, and then the overall test standard score was found, we see that the trainee group made a big jump in their scores vs. the control group that showed very little change in their overall standard scores.

We feel the exciting aspect of this score in particular, is that although the games do not specifically practice the skill of reading paragraphs and answering questions, because of the other auditory and visual processing skills trained in the U CAN CONNECT program, the results prove that overall reading skills improve as well.

Only 28 days of training (approximately two months) demonstrated these positive results, therefore what would more training do for each child?

For more information, go to  www.ucanconnect.org and play the free trials!

 

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© Can Stock Photo Inc. / michaeljung

 

iTouch = I touch everything

finger

We all make decisions in different ways. Some people act on impulse and buy the blender that can chop up a rake handle while others think, “why in the heck do I need something that blends gardening tools?” Online shopping is huge but more often than not, when I shop for clothes, I have to actually touch each item, something I get picked on for. “No, I’m not petting the shirt.  I just need to make sure that it will feel like PJ’s in the middle of the afternoon and not annoy me.”

The same goes for learning new things – we all have a learning style. Finally, in education there is a strong emphasis on individualized learning! No more “one book fits all.”  With online programs, mobile equipment and newer and better learning products, I for one am celebrating.

And this personalized learning does not represent a new way of thinking, because we have always known this was the right thing to do for students. It does represent a new way of teaching. With today’s technology and quality digital content, the personalization of student learning is at the touch of a finger – my favorite way to shop.

You can find great programs by “Googling” key words or phrases. Try these:

“reading programs for kids, reading strategies, educational games, online games for kids, kids reading games, ucanconnect, or visual learning games.”

Learning is just one touch away.

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© Can Stock Photo Inc. / robbiverte

Increasing vocabulary; leading the “blind” to sight words

Words

At age 7, Helen Keller, completely shut off from her world through the tyrant twins of deafness and blindness, recognized the word, “water” being finger-spelled in one hand while cool water flowed over the other hand. She made astounding progress, a mere 5 years later publishing her first magazine article and then in another 5 years, entering Radcliffe College. In her lifetime, she wrote 14 books and hundreds of magazine articles.

The children we teach in no way start out as sensory deprived as Helen Keller, but we do know that a child’s mind is only limited by the concepts he has names for.

Research has proven over and over again – vocabulary acquisition is one of the most important tools in expanding a child’s interaction with the world.

We know these things:

Vocabulary knowledge in kindergarten and first grade is a significant predictor of reading comprehension in middle and high school

Vocabulary strongly influences a teacher’s judgment of a student’s competency

Lack of sound vocabulary skills is a critical factor in school failure

It is estimated that a first grader needs to have 1,000 words in their reading vocabulary, which then soars to 10,000 for a third grader and 40,000 by the time a student is in twelfth grade.  That is an increase of 3,000 words per grade.  Studies show that disadvantaged children and poor readers acquire less than half of the vocabulary of their successful peers.

So many words, so little time!  hourglassWhat to do?

Have your child involved in learning programs that teach the sight words and the most frequently occurring words in print. The child should receive multiple exposures to the word by both seeing it and hearing it. Choose engaging reading games that not only build on sight word vocabulary but that also teach spelling, visual processing skills and other learning tools centered around good reading techniques.

U CAN CONNECT was designed with those ideas in mind. Each level has 3000 sight words and hundreds of the most-frequently used words in written text. Highly engaging, these online games are fun reading games that that were specially engineered so that parents do not have to monitor their child during play. The KidsSafe Seal says this is a website a parent can trust.

Check out www.ucanconnect.org.

For a list of the first 4000 words that a child needs to learn, visit www.thefirst4000words.com.

Your child has 40,000 words to learn – if Helen Keller can do it, so can your child! Just get going.

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@ Can Stock Photo Inc. / photobee

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© Can Stock Photo Inc. / grgroup

Low reading skills are a crime!

teen in handcuffs

2/3 of students who cannot read proficiently by the end of 4th grade, will end up in jail or on welfare.

 

We’ve recently put our reading program U CAN CONNECT in a local Boys and Girls Club and it has been so rewarding.  I discovered a whole new group of kids to admire – those who functionally cannot read but they’re so willing to try.  One third grade boy with a bright smile and dark tousled hair looked me in the eye and said, “You gotta to teach me to read or I’m going to be junk.”

Sadly, he’s right.

Year after year we hear these sad statistics but if we don’t know a low reader, we don’t think much about them. When a child is unable to read on grade level by the 4th grade, it affects ALL of us.

These statistics are not made-up statistics by publishers of children’s books or by tutoring companies – they are the yearly national facts pulled from court documents and employment records.

Here are the most-recent facts:

85 % of all juveniles who interface with the juvenile court system are functionally illiterate.

prison doors

    More than 60 % of all prison inmates are functionally illiterate.

Penal institution records show that inmates have a 16% chance of returning to prison if they receive literacy help, as opposed to 70% who receive no help. This equates to taxpayer costs of $25,000 per year per inmate and nearly double that amount for juvenile offenders.

Illiteracy and crime are closely related. The Department of Justice states, “The link between academic failure and delinquency, violence, and crime is welded to reading failure.” Over 70% of inmates in America’s prisons cannot read above a fourth grade level.

Many of the USA ills are directly related to illiteracy. Just a few statistics:

Literacy is learned. Illiteracy is passed along by parents who cannot read or write.

One child in four grows up not knowing how to read.

43% of adults with low literacy skills live in poverty compared to only 4% of those    with good reading skills

3 out of 4 food stamp recipients perform in the lowest 2 literacy levels

90% of welfare recipients are high school dropouts

Low literary costs $73 million per year in terms of direct health care costs. A recent study by Pfizer put the cost much higher.

These are staggering costs for our society and they do affect each and every one of us.

lightbulb guy

Want to help?

Look around in your community for opportunities to work with these low readers. Some ideas are the Boys and Girls Clubs, residential drug programs that house families, afterschool programs, Big Brother/Big Sister program and homeless family shelters.

This one simple solution will help children learn to read:

Choose a book that is on his/her reading level, not grade level. Read it together in this way: You read the first sentence while the child follows along. Then, both of you read the same sentence together. Then the child reads the sentence all by himself. This teaches the sounds of the words, the feel of fluent reading and the sight recognition of the words.

We all can change the sad face of illiteracy in this country, one child at a time.

photo credit© Can Stock Photo Inc. / gajdamak

photo credit© Can Stock Photo Inc. / txking

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Does you child have good Core Strength?

girls working out

It’s January and we are all working out, regaining what the holidays took away, well actually what the holidays added, I should say.  But what about our children and this second half of the year?  As in any workout program these days we always hear about “strengthening our core” so our programs at the gym focus on that.

Now that 47 states have adopted the Common Core Standards, (CCS) it’s time to ask ourselves if our child has good core skills.

It took only a minute to get online and look up the CCS of Utah. However, the documents themselves would take about a half an hour to print. If we think back to the size of a phonebook, the Common Core Standards end up being about that thick when stacked on top of each other.

With these new standards come high expectations, so it’s important that parents are aware of where their child should be. This article will outline just a few of the Kindergarten and First Grade expectations.

Kindergarten Math benchmarks-

  • Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
  • Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence
  • Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20
  • Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.
  • Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of”/“less of” the attribute, like taller/shorter.
  • Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.
  • Add and subtract small numbers.
  • Recognize and name 10 shapes

Kindergarten Language Arts benchmarks

  • Writing the letters and knowing all of the letter sounds
  • Reading and spelling 100 sight words
  • Recognize and produce rhyming words.
  • Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words.
  • Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme words.
  • Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes) in simple, one-syllable words to make new words.

First Grade Math benchmarks-

  • Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number.
  • Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.
  •  Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used.
  • Subtract multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 from multiples of 10 in the range 10-90.
  • Understanding word problems that involve adding and subtracting

First Grade Language Arts benchmarks-

  • Recognize the distinguishing features of a sentence (e.g., first word, capitalization, ending punctuation).
  • Use phonic skills to read and write unfamiliar words
  • Identify the main idea and recall details in a story
  • Write about a topic with a good opening and closing thought
  • Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
  •  Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.

If you suspect your child may not be up to par on any of these standards, it’s time to put a “workout plan” in place in order to get your child into great Core shape!

Take the processing and reading test on our website, www.ucanconnect.org. See how your child stacks up!

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15 ideas to enhance early literacy skills

young boy reading a bookEarly Literacy Skills—How important are they?

Joshua is in 4th grade and getting quieter all of the time.  He usually cries everyday after school because he can’t read like his friends or he failed the word problems in math class again.  His mother thinks the quietness means he is accepting his lower reading skills, but she finds out he has just given up. Joshua’s parents work three hours every night on his homework, but they aren’t trained professionals and don’t have specialized programs.  Yet nightly drills are the only way they know how to help.

But is Joshua’s a rare case?

No, he’s actually a part of the majority.  His reading struggles match those of 68% of the children in the United States according to the recent statistics from the US Department of Education. Studies have shown that obtaining reading help by the first grade promises normal reading ability for 90% of these children.  If help is delayed until age nine, 75% will have trouble throughout their school years.

This doesn’t mean if your child is older than this, you might as well give up.  The book, Parenting a Struggling Reader suggests that as a parent you should “exhaust all promising resources when teaching children to read. ”

But by promoting early literacy skills in your home, your child most likely will not need help later on.

Here are 15 fun activities that promote early reading or school readiness in your preschoolers that can be done at home, without expensive programs or that aren’t time consuming.

  • Set up a Reading Hour.  You can go to the library as a family and choose the books for the next reading hour.  This creates a cohesive feeling that “this family believes in reading and enjoys it.”
  • Discuss the books with your child.  “What did the boy say? Or, Why did they do that?”  This promotes language skills, listening ability, and understanding the meaning of the story.
  • Act out a part of the story.  This teaches the love of a good story and creativeness.  Motor movement imbeds the ideas into the brain.
  • Enrich their vocabularies with picture books like, The First Thousand Words or books with pictures arranged by categories.  These books are  colorful or have items hiding on each page to make them fun.
  • Listen to rhyming songs or nursery rhymes since rhyming is important to develop good phonological skills.
  • Practice recognizing the alphabet by matching the ABC’s cut from different materials.  Write out the letters in sand.  Glue beans or beads to letters that are drawn on paper.Use clay to buil the letters.
  • Put puzzles together to teach eye-hand coordination and visual processing skills.
  • Dominoes teach matching.  Whether it’s matching animals, shapes or colors, the concept of what looks the same is important later in reading.
  • Find picture cards with basic sight words.  Cut out or buy individual letters of the alphabet and take turns picking a card and finding the letters to spell that word.
  • Read absurd sentences to your child and have them tell you the word that was wrong in the sentence like, ‘I ate a balloon for lunch’. Then they can fix the word.  This teaches listening for information.
  • Clap along to syllables or count out words in sentences by using a drum.
  • Make up silly stories.  Put picture cards face down on the table and start a story.  For example, ‘Yesterday I was walking down the road when I found a,  (pick up a card),  sock’.  Then have your child make up the next part using a card that they choose.
  • Hide cards with letters on them around the room.  The child goes around and finds the cards, but now he must identify them before putting them in a basket. Older children should tell you a word that starts with that letter.
  • Use pipe cleaners or string to make letters.
  • Draw letters or numbers on each others hands and ask what was drawn.  Younger kids can have a choice of three letters or numbers to choose from that are written out in front of them.

As you see, there are many fun activities to get your young child interested in reading.  The most important thing is to roll up you sleeves and start playing!

 

Technology – the changing face of education

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXV-yaFmQNk

A Magazine is not an iPad!

How fast things change. I bought a used Mercedes Benz in 1993 that came with a phone. This seemed like a bonus since I’d never thought to have what was then called a hand-held, portable cellular phone.  This one was built into the console and was roughly the size of a brick, so it wasn’t the portable variety. It was attached to the huge box by a three-foot cord; just long enough to feel opulent while driving down the road. I never paid for service. $199 for the plan plus an extra 59 cents a minute and 20% taxes was a ridicules fee.  Another caveat – there had to actually be one of the sparsely located cellular service towers in the area or it was nothing more than a box that left no room to hold a Tab.

My, my, my….how far we have come.

Now, often for free, we can talk, Skype, Viber or text people around the world or someone in another room of the house. If we are in danger on the road, instead of having to look for someone to help us, we can run from our burning car, with our credit card phone in our hand and get immediate help.

So what about the changes technology has brought to education? These new ideas can provide an amazing opportunity for a child to reach beyond the experience and knowledge of their teacher. Why limit that? Education as we currently know it in traditional schools will reach a tipping point, according to Stephen Harris of Connect Principals, in his January 2013 article. He believes that the current school model with exhaust itself sometime in the next decade. He asks, “Why would a child attend school in a traditional way if better ways to educate a child emerge?

Our children will interact with technology in ways that are not yet mainstream. Voice activated writing, touch screen technology, spreading from being fixed installations to multi-surfaced & pervasive…this will be their world.”

Just as we cannot envision our world today without our mobile devices to do our banking, travel plans, to entertain us, to gives us pictures of a world we have never seen, our children will not remember a childhood of learning or exploring solely through books or paper delivery.  Our children already seem to be born with innate touch-screen skills.

Mobile learning is the future. We need to embrace it.